A very digestable guide from Geri Reid on building forms. Not the code, but the design and UX principles that should guide the code.

Working on a design system for a bank has taught [me] a lot about forms. I’ve watched testing in our labs. I’ve worked alongside experts from specialist accessibility organisations. I’ve seen forms tested by disabled people and users of assistive technology. I’ve also read a lot of research.

From all this learning I’ve formed my own forms best-practice guidelines. 

I always think about one code-related thing when it comes to general form advice: all inputs need an attached label.

<label for="name">Name:</label>
<input type="text" id="name" name="name">

<!-- or -->

<label>
  Name:
  <input type="text" name="name">
</label>

It’s HTML 101 stuff, but so many forms fail to do it. I once heard a story about blind college-bound high school students who were unable to apply to college specifically because they couldn’t figure out what the inputs wanted on a form. They started second-guessing if they could do college on their own after that experience.

You know how The Onion prints the article “‘No Way To Prevent This,’ Says Only Nation Where This Regularly Happens” literally every single time there is a mass shooting? I feel like someone should make a website that publishes an article pointing to every single website that fails this one test with a headline like “‘No Way To Prevent This’, Says Website Where The Fix Would Be Typing A Handful Of Characters.”

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